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Greener on the Other Side

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Greener on the Other Side

As the second largest exhibition for young designers among Europe's design fairs, Greenhouse is a treasure trove of new talents. Famously debuting designers like Front, Nendo, GamFratesi, Form Us With Love and Morten & Jonas, this year's exhibition not only has been moved to a new and larger area, there's also a new award to be won. The "Best Performance" - selected by jury includes Jens Fager, designer; Anya Sebton, interior architect & designer; Monica von Schmalensee, architect; and John Löfgren, designer - was in the end awarded to Tokyo based designer Ryu Kozeki for his poetic and sculptural lighting.

Named The Oculus Project, this experimental design was to explore the relationship between the light and the object. The "High",  "Middle", "Low" version the objects are based on the same monolithic form that is carved by the radial shape of the light. The form distinction is caused by the difference of the light source position which has a few centimeters gap between each other in spite of the same Irradiation position. By illuminating the lighting object itself, the indirect light works as well as the direct one. The light on the object acts as a wallwasher to describe the distance of the light, and looks beautiful and efficient.

Tokyo-based designer Ryu Kozeki won the first "Best Performance" award.

As the jury concludes: "We were struck by a deep first impression. In a design that combines functional and technical light with a clear artistic approach, the designer has shown both curiosity and innovation through a totally new take on the lamp. The intention of having the lamp locally produced around the world also meets the jury's criteria of sustainability. "

Other than that, a couple of Asian designers also made an appearance here: from China's Celilia Xinyu Zhang and Mario Tsai Studio to South Korea's TIEL studio and Studio Millionroses; from Toronto, Canada's Hi Thanks Bye to Taiwan's Normal Object Factory and KIMU Design. All in all, a great and diverse representation of Asian design at Stockholm. Next stop: Singapore!

Equant Suspension Lamp.

Cecilia Xinyu Zhang with her Fractal Chair.

Cecilia Xinyu Zhang

Born and raised in Beijing and currently lives and works in Bergen, Norway, Cecilia's Fractal Chair first got on our radar when it won a Red Dot Design concept award in 2017. Subsequently, she has done quite a bit of work and showed a total of 4 items at Stockholm. Among them include the Equant Suspension Lamp, the S.V. Side Table,  The Fifth D Clock and two new products for furniture brand Northern. Our favourites would definitely be the former. By using an adjustable metal circular reflector, the suspension lamp can provide indirect, diffused and reflected illumination according to the user. When carefully positioned, the lamp will also reveal perpetual dynamics thanks to its pure geometric elements.

Normal Object Factory with their PIN self-watering tool

 TING Lamp - A cross between a lantern and a rocking horse.

Normal Object Factory

Founded in 2017 by Taiwanese glassmaker and designer Liu Chien-Kuang and Swedish ceramicist and designer Alexandra Nilasdotter, Normal Object Factory's work focuses on high-quality craft with inspiration from Swedish and Taiwanese design and craft traditions. Their PIN self-watering tool immediately caught our eye with its futuristic-looking form. This large, glass water storage bubble was designed to help keep the soil moist by delivering the water to the soil via a long thin tube. By relying on atmospheric pressure, water will be distributed drop by drop. Another beautiful object is the TING Lamp. By combining the form of a classic lantern and a rocking horse, the result is basically a lamp that creates warm and soft lighting, suitable for any bedside table.

The very colorful Sit-Up incense holder.

Studio Millionroses with their flat-packable 7 Degrees Stool.

Studio Millionroses

Created by Industrial Designer Hyung-Moon Choi and Photographer/Graphic designer Joo-young Kim in 2017,  Millionroses's projects are usually varied and conceptual. But this time around, their four designs certainly seemed more tone down and minimal. Their flat-packable 7 Degrees Stool was a triumph in terms of packaging and definitely IKEA worthy. Only using four wood panels, the stool can easily be assembled purely with the tension and strength of wood without any screws or glue. Similarly, their multicoloured Sit-Up incense holder also took inspiration from the tension of stainless steel sheet. The structure with two holes on the top folded slightly and fixed with screw makes it stable and easy to assemble. After burning an incense out, the ashes will be drop on the surface which is in a suitable shape to receive them so that you can throw them away. What's not to love?

The Graft table

TIEL Studio with their new The Crotch stool.

TIEL studio

Both graduates of the Design Academy Eindhoven, Swiss designer Charlotte Therre and Korean designer Joong Han Lee founded their studio in 2016 after having worked and gathered experiences simultaneously in the United States, the Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland. Their works often play on graphic elements resulting in dynamic visuals at every angle. For example, the Graft table is a hand-made collection, investigating traditional carpentry, with a modern twist. A joint is formed by two surfaces abutting at an angle of 45 degrees. The result is not only stronger in joints but also aesthetically intriguing. Similarly, The Crotch is an anatomically-inspired metal stool that only shows its real function when the legs are rotated. A truly brilliant idea in terms of providing extra seats in tight spaces.

 

For more about the Greenhouse exhibition, visit here.


Any views or opinions in the post are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors.



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