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Artzine

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Alexander Montague-Sparey, Director of Montague-Sparey, Fair Director of Photo Shanghai...
Our contributor series explores the ideas of gallerists, artists, directors, curators for an insight into the development of the international art scene......

July 25, 2014

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Bazaar Art Jakarta 2014...
The Artling recently flew to Jakarta to check out Bazaar Art Jakarta. Here are some images of what we saw……   Yoshitomo Nara  Semarang Gallery A Quiet Place #2, Andy Dewantoro Damage, Andy Dewantoro Artsphere Gallery Insectum Series, Agan Harahap Tree No. 23, Carlos Aguirre Katuki Keisuke  Ohnishi Yasuhiro  Tristes, Wang Zhibo Wave Drawing, Nobuaki Takekawa Scenery with Crane, Fumihiro Takemura Eko Nugroho  Postcards from the Alps, Eddie Hara Infinity-Nets [Riota], Yayoi Kusama   Yayoi Kusama    The Contingent 8, Jompet   Robert Zhao    Jalasveva Jaya Mahe, Heri Dono The Looming Dark Estuary, Sunaryo No Place To Hide, Entang Wiharso Etsuko Fukaya   ...

July 24, 2014

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Review: Zen Teh, ''Calls for a New Natural Order'' at 2902 Gallery...
Here in tiny, land-scarce Singapore, it comes as no surprise that nature’s often had to take a backseat to the demands of progress and development. Even as campaigns to save the Green Corridor and Bukit Brown make it plain that not everybody’s on board with the idea of replacing natural areas with highways and shopping malls, there’s precious little left of nature on the island. What does remain often ends up aggressively manicured, presenting not so much nature as some carefully orchestrated interpretation of nature, filtered through very human expectations and perspectives. Zen Teh’s first solo exhibition in Singapore, ‘Calls for a New Natural Order,’ examines, among other things, this curiously dysfunctional relationship with nature. It’s a relationship that could be compared, if we’re being uncharitable, to anime-obsessed shut-ins who become bizarrely attached to purely fictional characters.   Which is not to say that Teh’s photography can be boiled down to some nostalgic pursuit of images of an authentic, unspoiled nature – of lushly rugged landscapes to be contemplated at our leisure in a comfortably air-conditioned gallery. Hers is a rather more critical eye, questioning our relationship with nature and the landscape in three very distinct bodies of work from the past four years.   The series 'The Imperative Landscape,’ for instance, is built on dense, large-scale images of Chiang Rai forests, discarding the usual landscape format for less conventional shapes – a circle with a hole in the middle, a notched triangle, and what might well be a reference to the yoni symbol. Rendered in a subdued monochrome with a glossy diasec finish, these dramatic forms suggest both a confrontational graphic sensibility and a concern with sacred geometry – nature not as some passive ground to be built over, but an active, primal force, one which provides the foundations of our myths and symbols.   Though the show is largely one of photographs, there are influences beyond that of photography itself – most notably, painting, and particularly that of traditional Chinese painting. Teh’s 'Unknowing’ series and 'Singapore Landscape Painting’ are both printed on scrolls of hand-made paper, horizontally and vertically respectively. It’s a gesture that verges on affectation, particularly in the case of 'Singapore Landscape Painting,’ which requires you to carefully – almost tediously – manhandle the scroll to take in the whole image. The physical investment involved in viewing lushly verdant scenes of sameness seems to function as commentary in itself, on our endless vistas of cookie cutter flats and malls. Zen Teh, Unknowing Triptych   Composed as they are of photo-composites of various natural scenes in Singapore – ranging from familiar parks and reserves to other, less identifiable fragments of landscape – the two series suggest a relationship with nature founded, on some level, on some sense of limitless editability. An approach to the natural world that has something in common with Spotify’s systems of musical recommendation, or the filter bubbles quietly imposed on us by Google’s monitoring of our internet search habits.   At the same time, the compositing of these photographs to suggest landscapes wholly strange to our own experiences of Singapore suggests a touch of deception or concealment through collation, lending a touch of disquiet and unease to these otherwise lushly beautiful images. Far from simply indulging our taste for contemplating nature from afar, the show hints at some sort of complicity and instability, disrupting our settled gaze.   Calls for a New Natural Order runs until Aug 10, 12 to 7 pm Tue to Sat, 1 to 5 pm Sundays, at 2902 Gallery, #02-02 222 Queen Street, Singapore 188550. Closed on Mondays and public holidays. Free admission.   ...

July 16, 2014

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An Interview with Chun Kai Qun, Founder of Independent Artist Project LATENT SPACES at Haw Par Villa...
Chun Kai Qun is interested in the study of object biographies given our inadequate understanding of how they texture and inform human identity. He examines everyday objects as a reflection of personal tastes, attributes, moral principles and social ideals. Chun Kai Qun received his Master of Fine Art from the renowned Glasgow School of Art. In 2011, Chun was awarded the prestigious NAC Arts Scholarship (Overseas) and he was also the recipient of the Arts Creation Fund in the same year. Chun has participated extensively in art exhibitions, residencies and collaborations. His work has been shown in Singapore Art Museum, National Museum of Singapore, Esplanade Concourse (Singapore), Esplanade Jendela (Singapore), Art Stage Singapore, Singapore Management University, FOST Gallery (Singapore), Valentine Willie Fine Art (Singapore), POST-Museum (Singapore), Gertrude Contemporary Art Centre (Melbourne), National Taipei University of Education (Taiwan) and The Glasgow School of Art (UK). Chun Kai Qun, A Passed Life, Video stills, 2014 How did the idea of Latent Spaces come about? Please tell us a bit more about the people involved. And what do you hope to achieve? LATENT SPACES came out about because I was looking for a venue for my solo exhibition. It was an exhibition about Haw Par Villa, so it seemed pretty apparent that it had to be shown there. The process of taking over the vacant Jade House at Haw Par Villa involved a fair bit of renovation on our part, so for such an endeavour to be worthwhile, the idea of setting up a space to also show other artists then evolved. The group includes me, my brother Chun Kai Feng who is also an artist and Elizabeth Gan, an arts educator. We are actually uncertain how long we are able to stay in Haw Par Villa as it awaits redevelopment. However, LATENT SPACES is essentially a fluid model whereby we adopt idle spaces in Singapore and reinvent them as platforms for experimental art and social entrepreneurship. Haw Par Villa is a place of ambiguity, as several ventures had failed spectacularly, so it now bears a legacy of failures. However, that actually means there is nothing to lose for Haw Par Villa to be open to an experimental art project like LATENT SPACES. Since April, we have had three exhibitions at our space. The artists who worked with us include Sai Hua Kuan, Jeremy Sharma, João Vasco Paiva, Ang Soon Koon and Darren Tesar. I have a lot of ideas for exhibitions and the space helps me to exorcise these urges, I guess my aim is to get to the point when I actually run out of ideas what to do with the space. Undoubtedly, there was never an intention for the space to build a legacy or to survive as long as possible just for the sake of it. But, it is also undeniable that creating an artist-run space at Haw Par Villa has given us legendary cult status. Chun Kai Qun, A Passed Life, Video stills, 2014 Haw Par Villa was a popular local and tourist attraction in the ‘80s-'90s, am I right? What drew you to re-visit the site in 2013? As a child, I did not visit Haw Par Villa. I guess, as a Singaporean, it was simply about time that I have to visit the place. But I was also suggested by a friend to research on the dioramas of Haw Par Villa because I was building some of my own. People recognise you as an artist who works with different media. What compelled you to try your hand at curating projects? Do you see it as an extension of your main artistic practice? I just wanted to try more things, not just in the realm of art, but life in general. Curating betters me as a generous person because I do take time away from my own work to help others present theirs. There are artists, whom I admire, but I just simply cannot do what they do, curating is a way for me to be involved with their works. I am not comfortable with the idea of a main practice, as it is probably due to the lack of ability to upkeep several interests at the same time, resulting in the need to choose one that you are really good at. I actually enjoy the impossibility to pin down what I am really good at. How will this experience influence your future work? OR what other concepts do you explore through your artistic practice? To be able to play many roles probably means I can find work in many places. As I am able to fall back on other interests, it leaves me open to question certain things I have done for many years. I do not have to hold onto an idea that has gone stale, as a better idea can take over. Reflecting on your creative path, which artists have influenced you? What is your personal life philosophy? Tang Da Wu who taught me while I was studying at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts made an everlasting impression on me. The humour of Glaswegian artists will continue to tickle me. I do not like to owe anyone a living, when I make art I try to do everything within my means. My exhibitions are usually quite easy to install. Chun Kai Qun, A Lifetime of Warranties,Installation2014 A Lifetime of Warranties by Chun Kai Qun runs 28th June-27th July at LATENT SPACES @ Haw Par Villa, 262 Pasir Panjang Road Singapore 118628 Gallery Opening Hours: Thursday to Sunday, 1:00 pm to 6:00 pm Monday to Wednesday, by appointment only ...

July 16, 2014

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Reflections: King For a Day by Equator Art Projects ...
Check out some of the artists' reflections on their works in "King For a Day," now showing at Equator Art Projects. ...

July 16, 2014

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EDITION(ED)...
The Art Galleries Association of Singapore presents their annual exhibition titled Edition(ed) at [email protected], from 17 - 20th July. Over 20 participating galleries will be showcasing more than 70 works ranging from photographs, prints, sculptures and digital works. The Artling director, Talenia will be taking part in a panel discussion on the history and currency of editions, alongside Eitaro Ogawa, chief printer of STPI and Belinda Fox, artist and printmaker, Louis Ho, art historian, critic and curator, and moderated by Benjamin Hampe of Chan Hampe Galleries. Don’t miss this event! For more details, check out www.agas.org.sg ...

July 10, 2014

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New Exhibition: Cicadas Cicadas by Genevieve Chua...
Interview with Genevieve Chua ahead of her upcoming exhibition at GUSFORD Gallery in Los Angeles. ...

July 09, 2014

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Interview with Kelsey Offield, Gusford Gallery, Los Angeles ...
The Artling interviews Kelsey Offield of Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles, California. ...

July 09, 2014

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Charlotte Chen, Co-founder of Spottly...
Our contributor series explores the ideas of gallerists, artists, directors, curators for an insight into the development of the international art scene......

June 29, 2014

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Art Inspiration for your living space ...
Ever wondered how to style your homes with Art? The Artling shows you how to spice up your cosy livingroom spaces! Photo from theaestate.tumblr.com/ Photo from Design-milk.com Photo from Herz-allerliebst on Flickr   Photo from design-milk.com   Photo from planete-deco.fr  And here’re some inspirations with our Artworks…. Featuring Heman Chong (Original Photo by Alina Rybacka-Gruszczyń)  https://theartling.com/artists/heman-chong/   Featuring Guang-Yu Zhang (Original photo from tapja.com)  https://theartling.com/artists/guang-yu-zhang/ Featuring Pariwat Anantachina (above) and Shishido Ryuji (bottom). (Original Photo by Rafael Rais) https://theartling.com/artists/pariwat-anantachina/ https://theartling.com/artists/shishido-ryuji/   For more of such inspirations, you may visit our Interior Moods Page or Pinterest!  ...

June 27, 2014

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