USD IconCaretDown
EN IconCaretDown
IconHamburger
IconSearch
IconClose
IconSearch
IconCaretDown
By Medium
USD IconCaretDown
EN IconCaretDown

Back to Artzine

 

Author Archives: Tolla  Sloane

Placeholder
5 Stars: Art Reflects on Peace, Justice, Equality, Democracy and Progress...
The Artling recently got a sneak preview of Singapore Art Museum’s newly-opened 5 Stars: Art Reflects on Peace, Justice Equality, Democracy and Progress exhibition. This exhibition provided the Singapore Art Museum (SAM) with the opportunity to commission five artistic legends of the Singapore art scene to create new work in response to the Golden Jubilee. The artists are Matthew Ngui, Suzann Victor, Ho Tzu Nyen, Zulkifle Mahmod along with art historian TK Sabapathy.  This is Matthew Ngui’s first new public work in 3 years. Ngui is a Singapore / Freemantle based artist and curator whose last huge project was the Singapore Biennale 2011. Ngui was invited to explore Democracy. Continuing his exploration of anamorphosis -  a distorted perspective requiring the viewer to occupy a specific vantage point to reconstitute the image – Ngui invited 10 Singaporeans from different walks of life to sum up Democracy in a Singapore context in 50 words. Their words are painted across a forest of white poles. As you wander through the forest you try to piece together their responses. At certain vantage points you can make out a whole sentence. This is a neat and effective physical representation of the need to “walk in someone else’s shoes” before you can understand their viewpoint.  T.K. Sabapathy’s “Of Equal Measure” (2015), Books, mixed media, video and artworks The TK Sabapathy room is a tribute, more than an art work, to Singapore’s Minister Mentor of Art History. He has mentored many of the curators and artists working in Singapore’s museums and is revered as a guide to the study of, and the need to study, art history. As Joyce Toh, the SAM curator, said “If you don’t know history you don’t know yourself”. Sabapathy’s latest academic project was a monograph of Kumari Nahappan so to end the chronological overview of his work, Nahappan was invited to create a conceptual portrait of Sabapathy. The work sees Nahappan departing from her usual palette of orange and red, instead working in blue, green and yellow. The yellow represents the deep knowledge of her subject. Overall this room is a powerful tribute.  Suzann Victor’s “Bloodline of Peace” (2015), Fresnel lenses, blood and metal pins Suzann Victor’s work explores Peace. The installation has a soaring, cathedral-like impact on the space which seems appropriate given the theme. It involves a huge amount of hand craft and has been constructed to be agile which enables it to be installed to suit any architecture or space – almost like the works of El Anatsui. The work is constructed from small drops of blood contained within magnifying plates used by scientists. The blood was donated by diverse groups of Singaporeans who were interested in capturing the essence of the hard won peace of the second half of the 20th century. The combined impact of the personal commitment of the donors, the handicraft of the artist and challenges of blood as a biohazard leads to a work that succeeds on conceptual, aesthetic, material and craft-based levels.  Zulkifle Mahmod’s “Raising Spirits and Restoring Souls” (2015), 64-channel midi controller, solenoids, e-bows, amplifiers, piano/bass/guitar strings, copper pipes, midi player and others The exhibition was curated by Joyce Toh, Tan Siuli and Louis Ho and runs from 2 October 2015 - 2 May 2016 .   For more information on the exhibition, please click here. Singapore Art Museum 71 Bras Basah Road Singapore 189555    Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

October 02, 2015

IconCaretRight
Placeholder
How to Successfully Invest in Art - I...
I do not wish to measure art in purely dollar terms so I would like to clarify what I mean by “invest”. There are two Oxford English Dictionary definitions of Invest: (i) Put money into property with the expectation of receiving a profit; and (ii) Devote one’s time, energy and money to an undertaking with the expectation of a worthwhile result When I say that anyone can successfully invest in art I refer to definition (ii). By investing in art with your time, money and enthusiasm you achieve a worthwhile result: the knowledge and pleasure found in art itself. With this approach, over time, you’ll become a connoisseur. Through connoisseurship you are very likely to meet definition (i) and receive a profit. I am not an economist, however, you can look at art investment from the famed Warren Buffet’s perspective without having to squeeze art into one of the traditional asset classes (Melanie Gerlis demonstrates the difficulties of doing this in her analysis Art as An Investment – A Survey of Comparative Asset Classes). Warren Buffet advocates investing in companies that you wish to be part of for a lifetime and calls it “value investing”. He invites investors to research all aspects of a company including the CEO and to spend a significant portion of time as an investor, thinking. If you invest in artists by honing your knowledge, understanding their ideas and future plans, their management and their other investors and support them over the course of their career, your art collection will likely become something of immense value to pass on to your children. This is very different from trading or flipping or following “hot” art trends. There is no short cut to connoisseurship and it does take time, energy and money. Talking to artists, other collectors, curators and art advisors and using the plethora of information available on the internet will increase the pace of learning. A collector friend of mine shared this wonderful anecdote with me. He has placed a large painting by an artist he knows well where his television used to be. He now comes home after a hard day at work and sits down with a whiskey to look at the painting instead of watching TV. Each evening it intrigues him, inspires him and allows him to relax and unwind. —————————————————————————————————————————- Director / Curator / Art Advisor  Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

July 23, 2015

IconCaretRight
Placeholder
Will the Rise in Swiss Franc Impact the Art Market?...
With a 30% rise in the value of the franc against the euro, costs of luxury Swiss brands such as Rolex have increased. The move has hit the tourism industry, the watch industry and currency traders but seems unlikely to impact the global art market. The Swiss art fair, Art Basel, is the epicentre of the global art scene and it looks as though the local currency shift will have little impact on business there.  The costs of attending Art Basel, as a gallery and as a collector, will increase, however, art work prices will remain constant as they are listed in US dollars and euros. At this level, a small increase in travel, hotel and other costs is unlikely to deter collectors and galleries visiting one of the most prestigiousfairs in the world.  In addition, collectors holding Swiss francs will have increased spending power when buying works priced in US dollars or euros. The franc has strengthened about 9.6% against the US dollar and 13% against the euro since the Swiss National Bank scrapped its cap in January.  Image from MySwitzerland.com   We spoke to Singapore-based, Swiss art dealer, Frédéric de Senarclens of Art Plural Gallery, for his perspective. He was upbeat and does not think the rise will negatively impact the art market.  We asked him specifically if collectors and galleries might prefer Art Basel Hong Kong over Art Basel this year, as a result of increased costs in Switzerland.   “I doubt it. Art Basel is unique. Collectors see Art Basel as the premier art fair with strong gallery selection and will want to be part of it. Asian galleries are unlikely to be deterred by this rise as there is a different collector profile. Asian galleries will still want to go if they can, regardless of increased costs of attending.”  Now the dust has settled on the news that startled markets in January, it seems the impact will be felt very lightly in the art world. Meanwhile, the euro is falling against Asian currencies, making art works from European-based galleries better value for Asian collectors.  Watch this space for our reports on Art Basel Hong Kong in March.  Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

February 26, 2015

IconCaretRight
1
1
IconCaretLeft
IconCaretRight
Placeholder
ART 101
Placeholder
Art Fairs
Placeholder
Exhibitions
Placeholder
City Art Guides
Placeholder
Interviews
Placeholder
Artist Features
Placeholder
Design
Placeholder
Artling Social
IconCaretDown

Back to Top


Sign up for the latest updates
in contemporary art & design!

Please correct the errors above
IconAvailableOnAppStore

The Artling

IconCaretDown

Customer Care

IconCaretDown

Shop

IconCaretDown

Sell

IconCaretDown
The Artling Logo