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Indonesian Artists at Bazaar Art Jakarta ...
It is just days till Bazaar Art Jakarta 2015, one of the most exciting Contemporary art events in South East Asia. Over 50 galleries, representing artists from all over the world will be displaying a variety of paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings and much more. Leading up to the event, The Artling would like to share a few Contemporary Indonesian artists’ whose work we look forward to see this year.     Gatot Pujiarto Gatot Pujiarto, Fight Against Devil, 2008, Acrylic and paper magazine on canvas Image: Pearl Lam Galleries        Wimo Ambala Bayang  Wimo Ambala Bayang, High Hopes (Julia wants to be successful), 2008 Image: Ark Gallerie     Wedhar Riyadi Wedhar Riyadi, Cover Girl, 2015, Oil on Canvas Image: Ocula via Ark Galerie       Rudi Hendrianto Rudi Hendriatno, Time Machine, 2014, Teak Wood Image: Gajah Gallery     Yusra Martunus Yusra Martunus, 15021, 2015, Acrylic on canvas Image: Ocula via Gajah Gallery     Ugo Untoro Ugo Untoro, In Yellow No.2, 2015, Oil on canvas Image: Ocula        Hahan Hahan, One for All, All for One…Sold, 2014, Acrylic on canvas Image: ARNDT   Angus Suwage Angus Suwage, Self Portrait and Co #3, 2013, Oil, acrylic and bitumen on canvas Image: ARNDT     Jigger Cruz Jigger Cruz, Give Me Some Bones, 2015, Oil on Canvas and Wood Image: ARNDT     Any views or opinions in the post are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

August 26, 2015

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Interview with Bambang 'Toko' Witjaksono...
The Artling interviews ART|JOG 2015′s curator, Bambang ‘Toko’ Witjaksono, to find out more about this year’s fair and how ART|JOG has progressed since it was first launched in 2008.  What is the story behind this year’s theme, “Infinity In Flux”? The theme of infinity in flux was partly inspired by visitors of the previous ART|JOG who incessantly took selfie snapshots with the artworks they find appealing. Although this behaviour may seem ‘disruptive’ to some – it also shows their need to be ‘close’ to art. Then we have an idea to present the artworks that could interact with all of the visitors and inter media (we tried to reduce the conventional artworks). After all, we also had a plan to present Yoko Ono as our special presentation, due to her participation in a Fluxus movement. We saw the common thread and here it is. Image courtesy of ART|JOG 2015   How has ART|JOG grown since its launch in 2008? ART|JOG has had excellent growth that could even be said to be quite rapid. In 2008 we were just beginning, with name Jogjakarta Art Fair (JAF) which was part of the Festival Kesenian Yogyakarta (Yogyakarta Arts Festival), so it did not have a special theme and display of the artworks was still very usual, as well as the exhibitions in general. Starting in 2009 Jogja Art Fair had a curator and chose special themes, the same year we started to choose the artists as Artist Commissioned to convert the façade of Taman Budaya Yogyakarta (as a venue of the exhibition). In 2010 the name of this event began to be replaced to ART JOG, because we want this event as an international event. We invited Lorenzo Rudolf (Director of Art Stage Singapore) to officiate this event and held a focus group discussion with mainly the theme/subject: ART JOG in the future. In 2011, more and more visitors from abroad came, as ART|JOG became more publicized. In 2011 we invited international artists to participate in the Special Presentation program, namely Ashley Bickerton. At the 2012-2014 editions of ART|JOG we used parallel themes, based on post colonialism theory and historical context about Indonesia and Asia. We tried to focus mainly on our theme as a foothold. We chose some artists as our special presentation, from 2012: Wim Delfoye, 2013: Stefan Sagmeister and 2014: Marina Abramovic & teamLab (Japan). ART|JOG is widely known throughout the world, mainly because of its unique as an artists’ art fair (because there is no gallery representation in the booth) or some call it a biennale fair (because of the strong curatorial theme). In 2015 ART|JOG wants to increase the level and choose the curatorial theme based on the type of the artworks, so that it can reflect contemporary art and can more freely invite foreign artists to join. Are the majority of your visitors from Indonesia? Have the number of international visitors to the fair changed over the years? Yes, the majority is dominant from Indonesia. But year by year maybe now the number between local and foreign is same. As our database list, this year most of the foreign visitors come from Singapore, Australia, UK and Hong Kong. Total number of visitors last year was 100.000 for the three weeks period of ART|JOG. And for this year, at the opening, more than 1.000 people came.  Image courtesy of ART|JOG 2015   Have you seen an increased interest in Indonesian art from abroad in recent years? Over the years the number of art lovers is increasing, not only from Indonesia but also from foreign countries who have bought artworks from Indonesian artists. I think it is related with the strong art scene phenomena in Indonesia and the friction of the attention from China to Indonesia.  How were the works selected to be included in this year’s edition of ART|JOG? The artworks are selected based on the curatorial theme and innovation aspects. So many good artworks were submitted, but just a few artworks were selected which are relevant and suitable with the curatorial theme. This year we emphasize artworks which has inter media, interactive and innovative aspects. We also rejected the artworks from invited artists because the characteristics is too conventional. This year, we just selected one painting (on canvas) to be displayed at ART|JOG.  Bambang ‘Toko’ Witjaksono (left) with ART|JOG 2015′s Director Satriagama Rakantaseta. Image courtesy of ART|JOG 2015   How did the audience and collectors respond to the works included this year? This year we presented the relations between art and technology and their characters which have no boundaries with the audiences. We got positive responses, they said it’s peculiar. The new characteristic of artworks need a new way for appreciating, and also the new way for collecting.  What do you see as Indonesia’s role within the broader Southeast Asian art ecosystem? What about within the global art scene?  The Indonesian art scene is very strong and I think we could be dominating in South East Asia and this also remarks on the international art scene. It’s because Indonesian art has their unique characters and the different themes from the artists. It is also supported by the dynamics art atmosphere in Yogyakarta.    ————————————————————————————————————– 16 June 2015 Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors....

June 16, 2015

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Art|JOG 2015 - Highlights!...
The Artling was at ART|JOG as one of the Official Online Media Partners for their 8th edition and we have some great images to share in case you missed it! It was held in Taman Budaya, Yogyakarta, and their theme for this latest edition is titled ‘Infinity in Flux’.   “An annual art fair since 2008, ART|JOG actively involves participating artists in the display of their works and interaction with the public. Its closeness with the artists is what makes ART|JOG unique and different from any other art fairs.  Through its open call application system, ART|JOG engages both emerging and established artists in the quest to offer a fresh approach in contemporary art. Now entering its eighth year, ART|JOG returns with INFINITY IN FLUX— the Unending Loop that Bonds the Artist and the Audience.”  ART|JOG 2015 is on from the 6th to the 28th of June, 2015. Yoko Ono’s Wish Tree, 1981-2015   Installation work by Cake Industries Setu Legi’s The Chorus Offering Compliments, 2015 Mulyana’s Cloud Corals, 2015 I Nyoman Masriadi’s SHANGRi-LA, 2015 Bejo Wage Suu’s Pipo Bocor, 2015 Heri Dono’s Fermentation of Nose, 2015 Arya Pandjalu’s Keras Kepala, 2015 Laksmi Shitaresmi’s Little Nahkoda, 2015 Handiwirman Saputra’s Outside Masquerading as Inside (and vice versa), 2008-2015 Aditya Novali’s Conversation Unknown, 2015 KA’a’s Net Impact, 2015 ————————————————————————————————————– Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

June 11, 2015

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Paris Photo Blog, Part II...
A selection of photos from The Artling’s week in Paris for Art Paris Art Fair 2015!  Secret Archipelago Exhibition at Palais de Tokyo Zai Kuning’s Dapunta Hyang – Transmission of Knowledge, rattan and cotton strings Filipino artist Ryan Villamael’s work at the Palais de Tokyo  Art Paris Art Fair 2015 A work by Loredana Nemes at the Podbielski Contemporary booth  ———————————————————————————————————— Photos by Talenia Phua Gajardo ...

April 01, 2015

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Interview with Naohiko Kishi & Takahiro Kaneshima of Art Fair Tokyo...
Japan’s largest gallery show closed a few weeks ago, running from the 20th to the 22nd of March 2015, with a record number of 55,000 visitors. The Artling interviewed Art Fair Tokyo’s Executive Producer, Naohiko Kishi, & the fair’s Program Director, Takahiro Kaneshima, to find out more about how the fair has changed since its inception and where they see it going in the future.   Art Fair Tokyo is now in its 10th year. How has the fair changed since it was started in 2005? ARTFAIR TOKYO used to be NICAF, which was held eight times from 1992 until itchanged its name to ART FAIR TOKYO and took on a larger commercial dimension. Thenew incarnation of the fair was held for the first time in 2005. Then we had around 80 gallery booths and some 30,000 visitors, whereas now there are close to 150 booths, including galleries, corporations and partners, with some 55,000 visitors. We have also developed the fair to be a platform examining art in a variety of ways, putting efforts into projects like the Artistic Practices series, talks, and workshops. In five years’ time the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games will be held in Tokyo. The Games are not simply a sporting event and we aim to integrate our fair with them to form a large festival of culture and sports. With our tenth anniversary now here, we are entering a new phase where we need to consider how the fair will engage with the upcoming Olympics. Rimpa Pop, © ART FAIR TOKYO, Photo Munetoshi IWASHITA  Are visitors to the fair mostly from Japan? Where do some of your most active collectors come from?  Visitors from Japan are in the majority, but this year we held the fair right after Art Basel – Hong Kong, so there was an increase in overseas visitors compared to last year. Many of our collectors do indeed live in Tokyo but depending on the season, collectors come to Tokyo from all over the world and often purchase expensive artworks. Do you see the fair expanding further to include more non-Japanese galleries? We believe they will increase. With the government’s measures to increase inbound tourism, the weakening of the yen, and the upcoming Tokyo Olympics, not only overseas tourists but also affluent visitors to Japan will increase. We often hear people talking about their hopes to develop business models within the culture unique to Japan, so overseas exhibitors will surely increase in the future. © ART FAIR TOKYO, Photo Munetoshi IWASHITA    Do you think you will continue to include antiques and crafts-work alongside artworks at the fair?  We will continue with this policy. We feel that a major difference between ART FAIR TOKYO and other art fairs is its Japanese-ness. It features a wealth of artworks that can only be seen here in Tokyo, from antiques to crafts that have matured through the cultural influence of Europe, America and Asia, as well as the modern art that expanded from this. This has become a major characteristic of ART FAIR TOKYO. Antiques and crafts are a necessary element of our fair. Do you see Japanese collectors starting to collect art from other regions? Or are they still quite loyal to Japanese artists? Since 2012 we have included a section in the fair called Discover Asia (for our 2015 fair we unfortunately could not include it due to being too close to Art Basel – Hong Kong), and by continuing this program we sense that Japanese collectors are, little by little, developing overseas perspectives. Many Japanese collectors also went to Hong Kong this year and I feel that we are proactively joining up with the global trends of the art world. SCAI The Bathhouse, © ART FAIR TOKYO, Photo Munetoshi IWASHITA   Have you seen an increased interest in Japanese art from the international art world recently and do you see the fair as more locally -focused or international? Interest in the international scene is increasing. As a fair, the focus has indeed been mostly on Japan until now, but though we are always exploring the question of what is a “Japanese” art fair, it is not the case that we are aiming to specialize only in Japan. As we head towards 2020, we want to develop the fair further while maintaining our awareness of this Japanese character. How is the art scene in Tokyo evolving? Are collectors more keen on Contemporary works or are they more inclined to collect traditional pieces?  It used to be the case that only people related to the art scene would purchase certain artworks, but over the past few years the scope of collectors has opened up and there has been an increase in the number of ordinary people collecting art, including regular office workers and employees. The types of art being collected are also all on the rise, with people who previously only had an interest in antiques now also taking an interest in contemporary art, while young collectors who only had interests in contemporary art also starting to collect antiques. This is a very ART FAIR TOKYO-esque phenomenon. Contemporary Diversity, © ART FAIR TOKYO, Photo Munetoshi IWASHITA   What are some of the challenges that you face with the art scene in Tokyo? What do you think of your role as an art fair within that art ecosystem?  The art scene in Japan has until now been heavily supported by public investment, but every year government budgets are reduced. Today the situation where public agencies collect art is facing difficulties, meaning there is an urgent need for an art eco system appropriate for Japan, one that can stand on its own feet without relying on national or regional governments. As part of this, I feel that one of the roles for ART FAIR TOKYO is to further integrate the private sector that purchases art (both individual collectors and corporations), while building a framework for supporting art through the strength of the private sector and by enriching the layers of the art market.    ...

April 01, 2015

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Art Fair Tokyo 2015...
Art Fair Tokyo 2015 closed this past Sunday, 22 March 2015, with a record number of 55,000 visitors. This year’s edition of Japan’s largest gallery show featured 140 participating galleries, both domestic and international.  Located at level B1 at the Tokyo International Forum the fair seemed small from the outside entrance, it was in fact however much larger than it initially appeared, which was of course a pleasant surprise. On the whole, artwork that was of smaller dimensions, seemed to be the most popular with many pieces being bought and taken to their new homes. Among some of the pieces that caught my attention was the “Shiny Lotus” by Studo Yoko J  LUMITRANCE   Even in the early morning the fair was packed full of people  Wall paper art still seems to be popular in art fair, which whilst it looks lovely is highly impractical for the everyday person.  The amazing glass artist from Japan, Ms. Shohikawa poses next to her exquisite artwork which where brought to the fair by Takashimaya gallery.   Mizuma gallery presented a solo exhibition titled: “The reading” by Miyanaga Aiko.  Tomio Koyama was so packed, I couldn’t even enter the booth! This sculpture from Mariko Mori was also on display at Basel Hong Kong  Acrylic on wood by Ai Yamaguchi  The fair also had a large selection of antiques and ceramics which included this lovely piece.  This a modern take on the traditional urn…Made out of blocks of lego!  Arte Classic presented by Ishiguro Gallery; Cups for drinking green tea are a highly desirable and can fetch high premiums in Japan.  Kotaro Nukaga from Nukaga Gallery looks happy after a good day of sales in his booth at the fair.    ———————————————————————————————————   ...

March 26, 2015

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Art Paris Art Fair 2015...
Photos from Art Paris Art Fair 2015!...

March 25, 2015

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The Artling Galleries @ Art Paris Art Fair 2015...
Art Paris Art Fair returns this year with Singapore and Southeast Asia as the Guests of Honour. The Artling has put together a selection of artworks that you can expect to see from a few of our Partner Galleries at the fair, enjoy! Art Plural Gallery Sherman Ong, Peacock, 2006, Diasec Print on Archival Paper, 75x150cm. Image courtesy of the artist & Art Plural Gallery Kim Lim, Untitled Relief, 1983, Portland Stone, 24.8x29x15cm. Image courtesy of the artist & Art Plural Gallery Chan Hampe Galleries Dawn Ng, YELLOW, 2015, Matt Archival Digital Inkjet Print. Image courtesy of the artist & Chan Hampe Galleries Dawn Ng, RED, 2015, Matt Archival Digital Inkjet Print. Image courtesy of the artist & Chan Hampe Galleries   Element Art Space Arkiv Vilmansa, Another Arms, 2015, Acrylic on resin mounted on aluminium panel, 70x65cm. Image courtesy of the artist & Element Art Space   Hendra ‘Hehe’ Harsono, Bunny Pie, Acrylic on used cardboard, 13x10cm. Image courtesy of the artist & Element Art Space.  Podbielski Contemporary Ohad Matalon, Niad, The small crater, 2000, 110x165cm. Image courtesy of the artist & Podbielski Contemporary Singapore Tyler Print Institute Haegue Yang, Non-Folding - Scenarios of Non-Geometric Folding #4, 2012, collage, folded origami paper, white paper, spray paint, 176x121cm. Image courtesy of the artist & STPI   Eko Nugroho, Replacing Myself 4, 2013, Relief print, coloured shaped STPI handmade paper, 94x73cm. Image courtesy of the artist & STPI   Yeo Workshop Ian Woo, Hip Sway, 2014, Graphite on Paper, 115x115cm. Image courtesy of the artist & Yeo Workshop Marcin Dudek, Letters from Prison, 2015, Carbon paper, Gaffer Tape on Wood, 100x74cm. Image courtesy of the artist & Yeo Workshop   Installation view of the Yeo Workshop booth at Art Paris Art Fair 2015. Image courtesy of Yeo Workshop   ...

March 25, 2015

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Hong Kong Art Week 2015...
Hong Kong Art Week has come and gone! From the first edition of Art Central Hong Kong, to the third edition of Art Basel Hong Kong, to the numerous gallery events throughout the week; keep reading for a selection of photos from the week’s many events.  Art Central         Hong Kong Galleries     Art Basel   ...

March 17, 2015

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Decidedly Art Week: An Eye on The West...
While Singapore was in the midst of celebrating the much-anticipated Singapore Art Week at its various prominent locations, London’s busy art scene kick-started the year as the 27th edition of the London Art Fair opened its doors on 21 January 2015.  Running for almost 30 years, the London Art Fair was the first fair in London that prompted all subsequent blockbuster art fairs in the art hub (including the much-acclaimed Frieze). Yet this fair is resilient, and its art appealing to many, so it continues its legacy year in and year out with engaging works and a few dusty booths.  Well-known for presenting a wide range of modern and contemporary British art, the fair this year offered two new sections: Photo 50 and Art Projects. These were by far the fair’s most absorbing components, where the audience was confronted with conceptually elaborated works and engaging aesthetics.  In Photo 50, Hassan Hajjaj’s attractive installation Against Nature stood out. Mounted as a teahouse with stools and tables, the installation was a room – complete with wallpaper – decorated with intriguing portrait photographs on the walls. Hassan Hajjaj, who was born in Morocco and grew up in London, skillfully achieved a blend of traditional Moroccan and pop culture. Bright candy colors covered the whole room, as fashion logos intertwined with images of everyday people taken by the artist in the streets of Marrakesh.  Against Nature, a statement-like installation, was refreshing in the context of the fair, which, despite the numerous booths, offered a rather monotonous art repertoire. Another engaging work, in the Art Projects section, was Maugham by Amba Sayal-Bennett presented by WW Contemporary Art. Magnified structural drawings were projected on the gallery wall invading the space with light and geometry. Upon closer inspection, however, one would realize that these overwhelming architectural forms were actually made of several sketches all produced in a very small scale. The artist in her practice departs from familiar elements of everyday life and manipulates them to be reused as ‘words’ in her own visual lexicon. Amba Sayal-Bennett, Maugham, 2015, overhead projector, acetate-drawing prints, tape, foam, mount board, paper, 1.65x1.85.2.63m. Image courtesy of WW Contemporary Art and the artist   With a show of hands of 128 galleries the fair is said to have been successful in terms of transactions conducted in loco and art sold to new and seasoned collectors and art aficionados.  All in all, the fair, having taken place in a magnificent Art Deco building in east London, was compact and lively; but in a city like London, where cutting-edge art is a priority, one would expect more zest in the art on offer and a greater degree of curiosity towards countries, artists and practices not uniquely focused on the Western horizon.  Fairgrounds at Business Design Center, London N1   A different scale and setting was offered by the ArtRooms art fair, held 23-26 January at the Melia White House Hotel in the Fitzrovia art district.  The opening night was literally packed with collectors, art aficionados, habitues of art galleries and friends of the 96 independent artists that showed at the fair.  Following the trend of art fairs conducted in hotels (but strangely completely new to London), ArtRooms took place in a prestigious hotel, in which the booths were hotel rooms reconfigured by the individual artists and/or galleries as compact exhibiting spaces. With an astonishing variety of works and artists – considering this was the fair’s first edition (surely more to follow) – from the lobby to the star-like shape of corridors leading to the rooms, art was everywhere, deeply engrossing and refreshing. The strategic decision to push for the hotel-format art fair was supported by the founders, Christina Cellini Antonini and Francesco Fanelli, whose intention was to promote art primarily by individual artists, with the exception of a few galleries, in a more intimate space, relatively independent of commercial constraints.  Works ranging from full-scale installations to paintings, sculptures and digital works were featured in the domestic space of the rooms that facilitated impromptu dialogues between artists and the public. “this is a great opportunity to show art in an informal setting,” said Leandro Amstel Grasso, director and founder of Amstel Art Gallery, “the Fair it is casual and familiar, yet art is at the forefront.” Amstel Art Gallery, which will also be in the Hong Kong Art Fair in March, presented a variety of works by Italian artists, including Willow, former Geronimo Stillton cartoonist and now accomplished painter.  Willow, Community, 2012, acrylic, 200x200cm. Image courtesy of Amstel Art Gallery   Not lacking in zest and novelty, Willow’s bright works, crowded by little creatures pushing for their space on the densely populated canvases, were grabbing everyone’s attention for their peppy and uplifting emanation.  ...

February 12, 2015

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