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Artist of the Month: Tetsuya Toshima...
Japanese-born artist Tetsuya Toshima has never been afraid to play with different textures and iconography through his visually captivating illustrations. Selected as one of sixteen artists to watch in DAZED and CONFUSED magazine, the artist obtains a unique style by merging and drawing upon aspects from pop-culture, fashion and nature into his work. "Speculation" by Tetsuya Toshima Digital Print / 2011 / 30cm x 21.2cm / 11.8” x 8.3” / Edition of 75 / USD $210 Toshima’s work focuses on the notions of temporality and existence. He explores the theme of time by layering and fusing traditional imagery with more contemporary ones. By introducing subtle spills of colour, the artist enables one to focus on the three-dimensionality of the textures and patterns within his work. "Layer of pleasure" by Tetsuya Toshima Digital Print / 2011 / 40cm x 40cm / 15.8” x 15.8” / Edition of 75 / USD $225 The multiplicity and range of methods in which the artist uses has been critical for Toshima in projecting a universal consciousness of time in his illustrations. By making them digital, he is able to manipulate and layer his works to produce ethereal, powerful prints that truly resonates with the viewer. "Echo" by Tetsuya Toshima  Digital Print / 2012 / 30cm x 21.6cm / 11.9” x 8.5” / Edition of 75 / USD $210 Toshima has had his work exhibited all over the world including: Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Los Angeles and Rome. His digital illustrations have also been featured in various magazines such as Vogue, DAZED and CONFUSED and Icon Magazine. He has also worked with notable brands and companies, which has reflected his activeness in all fields of art such as television, graphics, illustration, interiors and much more.     To find out more about Tetsuya Toshima, please click here.   Any views or opinions in the post are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors.   ...

November 13, 2015

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Interview with Shirazeh Houshiary...
Acclaimed Iranian installation artist and sculptor Shirazeh Houshiary was recently in Singapore to work on her residency at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute (STPI). The Artling had the chance to find out a bit more about her experience at STPI and the artist's practice.    You’ve just spent some time at the STPI studio working on your residency. How did you find your experience? What do you think the importance is of residency programs such as STPI’s?  I enjoyed the residency and feel we created a new body of works, produced after much experimentation. The residency such as STPI’s program can offer time and space and resources to develop challenging and experimental works.  The artist's works-in-progress in the STPI studio Your body of work is comprised largely of sculptural and installation works – how have you incorporated your practice into to the print and papermaking process while at STPI? I have managed to incorporate both installation and sculptural discipline into print making, and  with the help of everyone at STPI we pushed the boundaries of how we could use paper and the process of printing. You will see the results in March 2016 at my show at STPI gallery.     You are interested in the scientific, yet your works are incredibly abstract and are very open to the viewer’s own interpretation. How do you reconcile these two dichotomous aspects of your works?  Typically my works are multi layered relating to human perception and all its processes. As a result my interest can encompass all human knowledge and feelings.      The artist in action at the STPI studio Language tends to feature in many of your works, but the value of the words is not in their meaning. What do you hope to convey through these words, if they are without their original function?  The origin of words and language were passed through by oral tradition. So words have sound.  Yet once words became visual, words lose their vibration and sound. By distorting the visual dimension of the words I hope to reawaken these vibrations and sounds.    You’ve mentioned that you spend a lot of time with your finished works before shipping them out, why is this? I can plan the structure of the artwork yet by spending time with that work one is able to perceive many more depths which otherwise would remain unknown. What are you working on in the next year? Any new projects coming up? I am working on new glass sculptures and progressing new bodies of paintings and planning a new video for all my forthcoming exhibitions.   ————————————————————————————————————– All images courtesy of the artist & STPI Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors.    ...

November 12, 2015

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Artist Feature: Ren Zi...
Ren Zi focuses on the role memory plays in our sense of identity & the world. This comes from having majored in psychology & the sense of loss growing up in a country whose past has all but been erased. Far from nostalgic, his works seem more like open-ended stories. They juxtapose scenes & figures from personal memory, history & mythology as invitation to weave your own connections/conclusions. His "7 elements" series, presented in his first solo show early 2013, draws upon the metaphorical elements that make up his personal cosmology to depict the transformational nature of memories.Returning to art after having spent his working life in the business of words, Ren Zi channels the mutative influences of popular culture, science & the multi-cultural strains that sift through the consciousness of his country. See a selection of new works from the artist below:  "Codices Form the Future: slipstreamslide" (2015) UV-resistant ink on clear acrylic & dichroic film "Codices Form the Future: allunion1" (2015) UV-resistant ink on clear acrylic & dichroic film "Days of Our Burning: Hour of the Wolf" (2015) UV-resistant ink on clear acrylic & archival photopaper "Days of Our Burning: Introducing the Night" (2015) UV-resistant ink on clear acrylic & archival photopaper "Elsewhere, A Negative Mirror" (2015) UV-resistant ink on clear acrylic, opaque acrylic & moire optical film "Mnemosyne #4" (2015) Installation with glass curtain, ikea furniture, CDs, books, vintage ibook, projection, digital print on clear & adhesive acetate (Image Credit: Lin Sheng) Detail view of "Mnemosyne #4" (Image Credit: Lin Sheng) Installation view from "Naming the Bright & Dark Stars" exhibition   Information on Ren Zi's Upcoming Exhibition: ∍∆∅∫⊥∞ : Invisible Frequencies 26 October - 13 November 2015 OCBC Art Space, 65 Chulia St About the exhibition: Eschewing logic as the dominant means of understanding our world & ourselves, Yen Phang & Ren Zi have sought to apprehend our experiences through other ways of perceiving & processing information. In many ways, their practices could be seen as chiral images of each other. Both deal with the phenomenological, yet adopt diametrically opposite foci (somatic vs psychological) & strategies (the language of science vs mythic archetypes). ∍∆∅∫⊥∞ : Invisible Frequencies seeks to capture a segment of their ongoing conversation, which follows a tradition of artistic correspondences, through conventional means & creative output. Also included among the works on show are selected email exchanges that serve as signposts to the spirit underlying their practice.    More works from Ren Zi: "Lightning #1" by Ren Zi Archival U.V ink on bamboo paper / 2013 / 80cm x 80cm / 31.5″ x 31.5″ / Edition of 6 / USD $1,515 "Fire #1" by Ren Zi Archival U.V ink on bamboo paper / 2013 / 80cm x 80cm / 31.5″ x 31.5″ / Edition of 6 / USD $1,515 "Portal" by Ren Zi Archival U.V ink on bamboo paper / 2013 / 80.0cm x 80.0cm / 31.5″ x 31.5″ / Edition of 6 / USD $1,515 Find out more about Ren Zi here.   Images courtesy of the artist Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

October 29, 2015

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Artist of the Month: Yansen...
Yansen Wayan Sudarsana is an Indonesian artist who creates intricate abstract paintings that are filled with energy and movement. By working primarily with oil on canvas, Yansen attains a wonderful translucent quality within his work and is able to achieve this through soft fluid lines and vibrant splashes of dispersed colour that interact between one another. His expressive pieces play with line, dimension and colour, producing a hypnotic image that transports one to another era.  Yansen at his studio in Ungasan, Indonesia In recent years, Yansen has participated in several shows around the world. Since the Indonesian based artist had his first solo exhibition in 2010 entitled “The Joy of Light, Dance and Mystery” at the National Gallery of Indonesia, he went on to exhibit in Paris at the Grand Palais, as well as in Russia at The-10 Dialogues Biennale Manege at the Main Exhibition Hall of St. Petersburg Federation in 2011. The following year his works were exhibited at the Bali Art Fest Asia, and in 2013 and 2014 he had pieces displayed the National Gallery of Indonesia for the 40’s Finalist Exhibition and 1st International Art Exhibition Indonesia-China respectively. BE128sen by Yansen Oil on canvas / 2014 / 101cm x 98cm / 39.8″ x 38.6″ / Unique Work / USD $9,000 Most recently, Yansen’s work was exhibited at the Ricart Gallery Miami in a group show last April. He was clearly no stranger to the Miami scene, having already established himself at the gallery’s 2013 group exhibition. The artist’s work was displayed twice in 2014 at the FACES exhibition and at another group show in September later that year. Yansen & Carolous, Faces Exhibition, Ricart Gallery, Miami-Florida Yansen’s exuberant pieces are passionate and powerful, yet attain a great sense of delicacy and fragility at the very same time. The beauty in his abstract works lie in the ambiguity of them, where one is left to be absorbed by his enigmatic, ingenious works of art. The luminous effect and layering of rhythmic patterns in Yansen’s paintings seem to be achieved so gracefully and effortlessly. The majestic scape he creates almost transforms into an oil spill of the most beautiful, sprightliest of colours. BE19sen by Yansen Oil on canvas / 2013 / 80cm x 60cm / 31.5″ x 23.7″ / Unique Work / USD $9,000 To find out more about Yansen, please click here.     Any views or opinions in the post are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

October 22, 2015

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Exclusive Interview with Ruben Pang...
The Artling interviewed Singapore artist Ruben Pang to find out more about his artistic practice and his stint as the inaugural participant in the Tiroche Deleon Collection’s Residency Program.  Tell us more about how you got involved in the Tiroche DeLeon Collection residency program? I first met Serge Tiroche at Art Stage Singapore 2014 and he’s been tracking my progress over sometime. He’s purchased some of my largest works, including Ophelia (2014), Auto-pilot(2014) and is the owner of the first triptych I’ve done. Over time, I familiarized myself with the artists collected by the Tiroche Deleon Collection and found several I could relate to. I took up Serge’s offer when he proposed the residency as it was clear that he sincerely wanted to connect with the artists he is involved in. Also, the dynamics between our aesthetic ideals could lead to something powerful. Did you have any expectations or hopes for your residency? If so, what were they? I expected it to be a challenge, and it was, both personally and in my creative practice. The purpose of this residency was to do things I wouldn’t otherwise have attempted. It was easier said than done – it’s not easy to switch into a completely different mode of thinking and painting, everything changes – the materials, technique and visualization. And although physically everything feels different, the work doesn’t necessary come out radically new. But I expected that of myself, and in my mind’s eye, I imagined becoming a completely different personality, successfully transforming myself within a few months into a polar opposite. Although mostly what happened in the studio was a falling short of expectations. The problem was that I didn’t want to be a gradually evolving artist or experience a metamorphosis in stages, not in terms of the ego, but that aesthetically, I wanted all traces of what I’ve fallen back on in terms of mark making and planning out the layers, to be completely wiped out, I wanted the shift to be violent. In hindsight, just the exercise created some new and interesting things that can be developed. “Jacob and the Angel” (2015), Acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel    Jaffa is perhaps one of the most culturally and historically rich places in the world. Did your faith play into your experience? I feel like my relationship with Israel, not just Jaffa, was just beginning to form and then I had to leave. I empathize now with religious people, and put in a bit more effort into understanding something which usually I cannot connect with at all. There’s no longer this invisible screen between me and someone devoted, it now feels like an energy that I can be on friendly terms with. In a sense there’s so much history, that its violent even thinking about it, you can’t read anything about Israel and not have it being told through someone’s tinted memory or agenda, which when you think about it is really just an exaggeration of the same concept that can be applied to any other place.  On a personal level, its also a place that surfaces things inside of you that you would rather hide, and so I experienced the worst in myself. In this sense, faith becomes so important. “Purgation” (2015), Oil, alkyd, acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel   What was the recurring theme in the body of work produced from your residency? The proposed point of departure was to explore the miracles of the New Testament – healing, exorcisms and iconic moments. It was something practical, it gave the residency a focal point but allowed me to revisit so many scenes with the potential to become dramatic paintings. It led me on to the current body of work I’m developing, The scenes I’ve chosen were about faith, trauma, acceptance and alleviation. The job was to find ways of articulating that without falling back on historically iconic imagery too much and hopefully, find potency in unexpected places. The house that you lived in in Jaffa was also used as the space for your exhibition. How did that affect, if at all, the living space versus work space dynamic for you? It’s very similar to how I’ve been working for a while now. I think the change of space from a white cube gallery to an actual home was something that contributed to me wanting to paint in several different styles – it’s just so unsettling to see a home covered in similar looking art. “Abstraction 1″ (2015), Oil, alkyd, acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel    Could you gives us some insight into your creative process? Up until recently, it has always been a mix of techniques, personalities, systems of composition which I’ve adapted, from artists that I admire. Early on, David Reed’s finesse with the blade was what I wanted to add to the arsenal of painting techniques. Later on Glenn Brown’s ability to simulate speed and violence with almost pixel perfect control taught me a different way of constructing an image. These came in addition to the staples like Flemish and Italian old masters.  First you have the color spectrum, then you have the texture spectrum, and lastly you have the personality spectrum (the most interesting bit), as if you could jump into different frames of mind – sometimes painting cautiously and deliberately, other times to replicate the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. I think it’s particularly fascinating to challenge yourself to combine almost opposing frames of thinking. For example, Glenn Brown’s fidelity is really unmatched, and he mentions how he wishes he could be a “hack and slash” painter. I’d try to fit that frame of thought into an aggressively painted painting. Over time I start to see where in this spectrum I tend to fall into, for example, its hard for me to paint without adding in some details, even if its a flat expanse of color, I start obsessing over the consistency. I think this exercise is just another step in getting to know yourself. I’ve always heeded Bacon’s advice for young artists: “a painter must paint, even if only out of imitation.” And I regard myself primarily as a student of art and music. Right now I’m obsessed with finding new ways to operate on the human figure, or to be more accurate, the character. One of the questions I’m dealing with now is: How do we paint so that the empathy is for the character in the painting and less so for the artist painting it? It’s tricky for me because I think once you start stylizing, distorting and adding yourself into the picture, the megalomania, the narcissism, the self portrait forced onto something else, these things become more prominent. I’m trying to paint these new works in a way where people forget about the creator for a moment–like in the movies.  “Abstraction 3″ (2015), Oil, alkyd, acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel   Who are some of your major influences? These are the paintings that first I first fell in love with before growing to appreciate the entirety of the artists’ works. John Martin’s The Great Day of His Wrath, Peter Paul Ruben’s Fall of the Damned, Gerhard Richter’s Portrait of Dieter Kreutz (the 1971 blurry version), Glenn Brown’s Nausea, David Reed’s #617 and #442 and Nigel Cooke’s Sing the Pumpkin Song. ”Unseeing” (2015), Oil, alkyd, acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel   Did you face any obstacles/challenges producing works given the context and specific political environment in Israel? My work is semi-abstract and generally not political, if at all, its barely noticeable, so I had no problems. Israeli artists face a lot of challenges getting their work shown elsewhere due to boycotts. It’s ironic because the boycott targets the very artists standing up against persecution. “Heatwave” (2015), Oil, alkyd, acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel     Many of your works contain forms and figures derived from literature; were you inspired by any of the biblical and mythological characters associated with Jaffa? Not exactly Jaffa, but the general location of Israel. Heatwave for example took inspiration from Masada, its environment and the stories associated with it. With regards to the characters, I think they were more about the scenes, and so identities wren’t as important as the physical movements in the frame. Jacob and the Angel was clearly biblical and because these stories are so iconic, I think its more accessible for the audience in general.  Unseeing was more of an interpretation of the notion of the blind being healed, in the bible its being healed by Jesus, but I didn’t want to have to keep painting Jesus over and over again in every exciting scene. Purgation is an interpretation of the experience of exorcism, again, with Jesus cropped out. It focuses solely on the figure undergoing the ritual. It was also one of the paintings where I think I was more successful in the simulation of painting from “the character’s” perspective, I was trying to imagine myself as a person who never painted before, just experienced an exorcism and had to illustrate it. So it comes out less three dimensional, the strokes are frantic but done in detail, I wanted it to be as if someone was in a hurry to get his story out.  “Raising Lazarus” (2015), Oil, alkyd, acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel    How has this residency impacted you and helped you as an artist and what can we look forward to with your next body of works? Its changed something in me, that’s for sure. I took some time off after because it was incredibly intense. Coming back to the studio two days ago, I have no idea what is going on. All I can say is, time spent away from painting reminds me of how important it is to me.  “Graduation Night” (2015), Oil, alkyd, acrylic and retouching varnish on aluminum composite panel    About the artist Born in 1990, Ruben Pang is an emerging Singaporean artist known for his stunning ethereal works painted on aluminium. After graduating from Lasalle College of the Arts, Faculty of Fine Art in 2010, the young artist has already had five solo exhibitions, the latest called Ataraxy at Chan Hampe Galleries. Pang made headlines in 2014 when nine of his paintings were sold within the short span of 60 minutes at ArtStage Singapore. He is also represented by two galleries, which include Chan Hampe Galleries in Singapore and Primo Marella Gallery in Milan, Italy. Most recently, Ruben Pang completed his three-month residency in Jaffa, Israel. He was the first participant selected in a joint venture residency program by Trioche DeLeon Collection and START- Serge Tiroche’s artist incubator project in Israel. About the Tiroche DeLeon Collection Residency Program in Israel The Tiroche DeLeon Collection residency program in Israel was launched this year, with Singaporean artist, Ruben Pang as their first participant. The residency program gives emerging artists the opportunity to work and live at Serve Tiroche’s waterfront home in the historical port city of Jaffa for up to three months. All living expenses are covered, along with flights, accommodation and working materials, enabling the artist to experiment and create works of art inspired by their experience. The body of work created during the artist’s residency will then be exhibited in Tiroche’s Jaffa house and following that, enter the Tiroche DeLeon and START collections and in local Israeli as well as international collections.      Images courtesy of Chan Hampe Galleries Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors....

October 02, 2015

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Artist of the Month - Ronald Ventura...
“The skin of his subjects can become an expressive surface, with tattoo drawings adding a new layer of meaning. Over the years he has developed a menagerie of what he calls “zoomanities” — human subjects with animal attributes, and vice versa — based on early 17th-century etchings of humanized animals he once saw.” - Sonia Kolesnikov-Jessop from the New York Times Ronald Ventura has established himself in the last decade as one of the most prominent Contemporary Southeast Asian artists. Since his record breaking sale of “Graygound”, which sold for USD $1.1 million at the Sotheby’s Hong Kong auction in 2011, the Filipino artist has continued to produce works of art composed of figurative motifs, using his multi-layering style which is unique to him. Point of Know Return 1 by Ronald Ventura Lithography and oil base paint on aluminium sheet, Lightbox 2012 70cm x 90cm / 27.6″ x 35.5″ Edition of 3  USD $11,200 Partnership with STPI   Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

September 24, 2015

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Artists in their Studios...
The Artling features a curated selection of artworks by artists living and working in over 20 different countries. With a majority of works produced in Asia or by Asian artists, we would like to take this opportunity to celebrate 10 artists across different countries within the region working in their studios.  Ketna working on the ‘The Last Asian Supper'  Working on 'The Fall of Venus'  Image: Artist’s Pinterest       Image: John Martono Image: John Martono       Farhad Moshiri in his studio in Tehran, 2008 Image: ArtAsiaPacific, photo by Shirin Aliabadi      Image: Cassette    Image: TrendsNow       Image: Artist’s Instagram   Image: Artist’s Pinterest     Chandraguptha Thenuwara working on ‘Spaces Giving Shade’ Image: GSA   Image: Geotamil       Image: Gridcrosser       Image: Amy Goodwin       Image: The Star   Any views or opinions in the interview are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. *Note: If any of these images belong to you and would like to be referenced, please do not hesitate to let know and we will happily make the appropriate changes. ...

September 24, 2015

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Artists Collectives in Yogyakarta...
Find out more about three of the top artist collectives in Jogjakarta: Cemeti Art House, Mes56 and Forum Ceblang Ceblung....

August 26, 2015

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Five Artists Art Lovers Should Follow on Instagram...
Are you addicted to Instagram? Art-up your feed with our picks of artists to follow....

August 12, 2015

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The Archivist Project...
The Artling recently visited The Archivist, an artist-run gallery and screenprinting studio in Bangkok. About a fifteen-minute drive out of Bangkok’s city centre, The Archivist’s screenprinting studio is small, but packed with small wonders and beautifully-designed graphic works fill the space. The founders of The Archivist, Minchaya Chayosumrit & Kanaporn Phasuk, gave us a tour of the space and showed us some works-in-progress.  Display cabinet filled with past exhibition materials and art supplies Santi Lawrachawee’s Memorandum of Understanding, 3-colour screenprint and TNOP’s A Conversation with Jean Arp, 6-layer screenprint The Archivist founders & artist Santi Lawrachawee in their studio!   Detail view of Minchaya Chayosumrit’s A visual sleep diary The numerous colours used for The Archivist’s hand-pulled screenprints   The exterior of The Archivist’s studio     If you’re in Bangkok and are interested in The Archivist, their space is open to the public and they host regular screenprinting workshops teaching the basics of the medium. Learn more here.    See more works from The Archivist here. ————————————————————————————————————–   Any views or opinions in the post are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors. ...

July 09, 2015

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