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Interview with Japanese Artist Teppei Kaneuji...
The latest artist to join STPI gallery’s Artist in residence program is award-winning Japanese artist, Teppei Kaneuji. Teppei is known for his assemblages which involve collecting objects to create an entirely new concept. In Endless, Nameless (Constructions), he was inspired by objects and symbols reflecting the culture of Singapore, a city which he describes as a collage in of itself. “Multi-cultures are blended together like chaos and order in one place.I was very much drawn to that, and I was influenced by the shape, colours and spaces of Haw Par Villa…”* The Artling speaks to Teppei about his experience in Singapore and the impact of this residency to his art. Before coming to Singapore what symbols / images did you associate with the country? And what are the new images that you would associate to Singapore after your 6-week residency at STPI and why? I had this impression that Singapore was a New Asia—much like a new wave unlike other Southeast Asian counterparts. I was surprised to find such complex cultures coexisting together in orderly fashion—all in one place.  Games, Dance and the Constructions (Color thick paper) #1 Games, Dance and the Constructions (Color thick paper) #4 Working with print could seem daunting to some artists who produce more sculptural artwork. You seem to have conquered this obstacle and seamlessly applied dimension to the work you created with STPI. What was that experience like for you, working with the tools that you were given? Because my style of working has always been to connect different dimensions and situations, it was such a great experience for me to work with different mediums at STPI.  There’s an entertaining energy to your construction, and everyday objects seem like they now have new roles to play.  What was behind the selection of objects that you brought together?  The objects are selected according to the work and what I set out to achieve. For example, in the case of the White Discharge series (pouring white resin over objects amassed together), I wanted to build a sturdy and tall structure, so I tried to collect different kinds of objects that could play the role of a column and a beam. That was the one criteria in the selection of objects for that work. The original meaning of these selected objects are different the way I see it and the act of putting disparate objects together breathes new life into them. It creates new encounters for all who see the result.  You collect things which seem to have no correlation to each other, and yet when you put them together, out come a certain cohesion that only you saw during the process of creating the work. Do you aim for the viewer to find and accept that same new meaning around the new object you’ve created? Or, do you encourage them to create their own when looking/experiencing the work? Even though we are looking at the same piece of art or object, how we interpret it differs according to one’s experience or cultural background. The things you know and the things you don’t also differ and that is beyond our control. Take for example my work Hakuchizu, where I poured white powder over various objects on a table. It was understood by some as the ashes of an atomic bomb or pollution from China. Some might say it’s a Japanese Zen garden, or a scene of winter, while others say it’s a fictional representation of the final days of the earth. Whether we’re aware of this or not, the notion of Variety will always co-exist in a space.  And, finally while on the subject of putting things together, which living artist are you hoping to collaborate with? Any artist whose language I do not speak.  Model of Something #8 Endless, Nameless (Constructions) opens on 20 September at the STPI gallery in Singapore and runs until 25 October. *Quote from the STPI website  ...

September 18, 2014

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Interview with Loredana Pazzini-Paracciani, Curator of Anthropos New York Exhibition...
The Artling interviews Loredana Pazzini-Paracciani, curator of "Anthropos," now showing at Sundaram Tagore Gallery in New York....

September 12, 2014

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Interview with Mr Sundaram Tagore...
The Artling interviews gallerist Sundaram Tagore, Founder of Sundaram Tagore Gallery....

September 06, 2014

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Beili Wang, Curator...
Our contributor series explores the ideas of gallerists, artists, directors, curators for an insight into the development of the international art scene......

August 29, 2014

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Sun Xun, Artist, Aug. 15, 2014...
Our Conversation Series features intimate interviews with leading experts from around the world: collectors, curators, artists, gallerists, and museum directors....

August 15, 2014

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Chen Wei, Artist...
Our contributor series explores the ideas of gallerists, artists, directors, curators for an insight into the development of the international art scene......

August 14, 2014

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Interview with Audrey Yeo...
The Artling interviews Audrey Yeo, Founder & Director of Yeo Workshop, Singapore. ...

July 31, 2014

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Interview with Ian Woo...
The Artling interviews Ian Woo, one of Singapore's Leading Abstractionists and Programme Leader at Lasalle College of the Arts, Singapore....

July 31, 2014

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Alexander Montague-Sparey, Director of Montague-Sparey, Fair Director of Photo Shanghai...
Our contributor series explores the ideas of gallerists, artists, directors, curators for an insight into the development of the international art scene......

July 25, 2014

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An Interview with Chun Kai Qun, Founder of Independent Artist Project LATENT SPACES at Haw Par Villa...
Chun Kai Qun is interested in the study of object biographies given our inadequate understanding of how they texture and inform human identity. He examines everyday objects as a reflection of personal tastes, attributes, moral principles and social ideals. Chun Kai Qun received his Master of Fine Art from the renowned Glasgow School of Art. In 2011, Chun was awarded the prestigious NAC Arts Scholarship (Overseas) and he was also the recipient of the Arts Creation Fund in the same year. Chun has participated extensively in art exhibitions, residencies and collaborations. His work has been shown in Singapore Art Museum, National Museum of Singapore, Esplanade Concourse (Singapore), Esplanade Jendela (Singapore), Art Stage Singapore, Singapore Management University, FOST Gallery (Singapore), Valentine Willie Fine Art (Singapore), POST-Museum (Singapore), Gertrude Contemporary Art Centre (Melbourne), National Taipei University of Education (Taiwan) and The Glasgow School of Art (UK). Chun Kai Qun, A Passed Life, Video stills, 2014 How did the idea of Latent Spaces come about? Please tell us a bit more about the people involved. And what do you hope to achieve? LATENT SPACES came out about because I was looking for a venue for my solo exhibition. It was an exhibition about Haw Par Villa, so it seemed pretty apparent that it had to be shown there. The process of taking over the vacant Jade House at Haw Par Villa involved a fair bit of renovation on our part, so for such an endeavour to be worthwhile, the idea of setting up a space to also show other artists then evolved. The group includes me, my brother Chun Kai Feng who is also an artist and Elizabeth Gan, an arts educator. We are actually uncertain how long we are able to stay in Haw Par Villa as it awaits redevelopment. However, LATENT SPACES is essentially a fluid model whereby we adopt idle spaces in Singapore and reinvent them as platforms for experimental art and social entrepreneurship. Haw Par Villa is a place of ambiguity, as several ventures had failed spectacularly, so it now bears a legacy of failures. However, that actually means there is nothing to lose for Haw Par Villa to be open to an experimental art project like LATENT SPACES. Since April, we have had three exhibitions at our space. The artists who worked with us include Sai Hua Kuan, Jeremy Sharma, João Vasco Paiva, Ang Soon Koon and Darren Tesar. I have a lot of ideas for exhibitions and the space helps me to exorcise these urges, I guess my aim is to get to the point when I actually run out of ideas what to do with the space. Undoubtedly, there was never an intention for the space to build a legacy or to survive as long as possible just for the sake of it. But, it is also undeniable that creating an artist-run space at Haw Par Villa has given us legendary cult status. Chun Kai Qun, A Passed Life, Video stills, 2014 Haw Par Villa was a popular local and tourist attraction in the ‘80s-'90s, am I right? What drew you to re-visit the site in 2013? As a child, I did not visit Haw Par Villa. I guess, as a Singaporean, it was simply about time that I have to visit the place. But I was also suggested by a friend to research on the dioramas of Haw Par Villa because I was building some of my own. People recognise you as an artist who works with different media. What compelled you to try your hand at curating projects? Do you see it as an extension of your main artistic practice? I just wanted to try more things, not just in the realm of art, but life in general. Curating betters me as a generous person because I do take time away from my own work to help others present theirs. There are artists, whom I admire, but I just simply cannot do what they do, curating is a way for me to be involved with their works. I am not comfortable with the idea of a main practice, as it is probably due to the lack of ability to upkeep several interests at the same time, resulting in the need to choose one that you are really good at. I actually enjoy the impossibility to pin down what I am really good at. How will this experience influence your future work? OR what other concepts do you explore through your artistic practice? To be able to play many roles probably means I can find work in many places. As I am able to fall back on other interests, it leaves me open to question certain things I have done for many years. I do not have to hold onto an idea that has gone stale, as a better idea can take over. Reflecting on your creative path, which artists have influenced you? What is your personal life philosophy? Tang Da Wu who taught me while I was studying at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts made an everlasting impression on me. The humour of Glaswegian artists will continue to tickle me. I do not like to owe anyone a living, when I make art I try to do everything within my means. My exhibitions are usually quite easy to install. Chun Kai Qun, A Lifetime of Warranties,Installation2014 A Lifetime of Warranties by Chun Kai Qun runs 28th June-27th July at LATENT SPACES @ Haw Par Villa, 262 Pasir Panjang Road Singapore 118628 Gallery Opening Hours: Thursday to Sunday, 1:00 pm to 6:00 pm Monday to Wednesday, by appointment only ...

July 16, 2014

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