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Cosmic Collisions: Yukio Fujimoto at ShugoArts, Tokyo

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Cosmic Collisions: Yukio Fujimoto at ShugoArts, Tokyo
Yukio Fujimoto, "The Music (Four-Panel Folding Screen)" (2013). Courtesy of: OCULA & ShugoArts, Tokyo

“Stars”, an exhibition of the works of Yukio Fujimoto is on now at ShugoArts, Tokyo. Throughout the gallery are large scale installation and sculptural works that are inspired by lyric/musical forms. The sculptures are minimal in their approach, sleek with a clean finish. The simplicity in the execution is made complex by the relationship that the object forms with the space that it is installed in. Meaning, the work demands a direct dialogue both from the space and potential viewers. There seems to be a code that can be accessed and understood if the minute details are paid attention to.

Everything is informed by something else from both immediate and the more expansive spaces. The universe is the source material in which these works are realized.

Patience. Awareness. Taking time. These are all encouraged of the viewer through the way that the works have manifested. The interconnections present in the composition of the artworks and the processes that cosmological objects in space undergo to form new objects. Everything is informed by something else from both immediate and the more expansive spaces. The universe is the source material in which these works are realized.

Yukio Fujimoto, "Eats With Chair (Mot)", (2007). Courtesy of: ShugoArts, Tokyo

Fujimoto was born in Nagoya and is now Kansai based. He is known for his multisensory works that were conceived from interese in sight, sound, touch, and smell. Early on in his career he thought of sound as an expansive space, which has visual resonance in his minimal sculptures discussed more in depth below. Fujimoto’s Stars (1990) is a mixed media work composed of 18 pieces. The large planks of wood beams on top of one another, installed central in the space. Tension in held in the center, where most of the points meet. Green on the interior, and black on the exterior, one is reminded of the excavations of meteors and other cosmological objects searching for hints of life beyond earth.

Tension in held in the center, where most of the points meet. Green on the interior, and black on the exterior, one is reminded of the excavations of meteors and other cosmological objects searching for hints of life beyond earth.

In Eats With Chair (Mot), the piece is constructed from steel, PVC pipe, and a chair. Immediately upon viewing this work one is provoked to think about why there is an absence in the chair. It could make one recall all those who have passed on before us. From another angle, one could be immersed in the reminder that this chair gives us that there are particles, energies, and invisible components at play at all times. The viewer is left to contemplate the persistent question of ‘why is there something rather than nothing?’

Yukio Fujimoto, "Stars" (1990). Courtesy of: ShugoArts, Tokyo

The Music (Four-Panel Folding Screen) is another exemplary mixed media form constructed from: wooden frames, acrylic panel, and music boxes. The piece is assembled across four panels. The lyrical composition of the gold leaf components on the glass feels to be in direct conversation with Kandinsky’s musically inspired paintings. Four is the traditional amount of ‘beats per measure’, a universal system for writing, reading, playing, listening, and understanding music. He notes that the viewers, without knowing it, are putting together sounds in space in a very similar way to which the constellations are made at all times. This is informative of the processes that Fujimoto undergoes when making the work; there is an active level of sensitivity and consideration towards what a viewer will see and feel.

He notes that the viewers, without knowing it, are putting together sounds in space in a very similar way to which the constellations are made at all times.

Fujimoto’s Broom (Coal) is installed at ShugoArts in it’s fifth edition. Realized from the materials: coal and a rubber sheet, this work has variable dimensions each time it is reinstalled. Despite the form being evocative of an asteroid belt, or smoke formation from the detonation of an atomic bomb, there is a remarkable quietness to this work. All the pieces are there, assembled intentionally, and it feels as though at that moment everything has come to the right place. The audience were allowed to walk on top of this sculptural work, which inevitably broke down the wall between viewer and active participant in continuing to inform the image with their presence.

Yukio Fujimoto, "Broom (Coal)" (2016). Courtesy of: ShugoArts, Tokyo

This exhibition is on view from December 2, 2017 to February 3, 2018. For more information on the exhibition, including accessibility and hours of operation, please visit: https://shugoarts.com/en/news-en/3302/.

 

 


Any views or opinions in the post are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors.


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