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Gallery Gala 2018: Auction Highlights

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Gallery Gala 2018: Auction Highlights

We’re just over a week away to the Gallery Gala, which will take place at the National Gallery Singapore on 8 November 2018. Held once every two years, the Gallery Gala is National Gallery Singapore’s main fundraising benefit and an opportunity for like-minded individuals, artists, collectors and patrons to come together for an evening of wonderful conversation and art appreciation. All funds raised from the evening will go towards the Gallery’s curatorial research, community and education programmes, and presenting its collection to the world through boundary-breaking exhibitions.

The Silent Auction closes 8 November at 10:00 AM EST and lots can be found here.
Live bidding begins 8 November and 8:15 AM EST and lots can be found here.

We bring you a feature of some of the live and silent auction lots that are featured in this year’s benefit:

 

Erizal As
Gurat Wajah (Facial Strokes), 2017 Oil on canvas 
59 1/10 × 59 1/10 in; 150 × 150 cm

Erizal As
This dynamic and emotive painting is amongst Erizal As’ acclaimed faceless portraits, which subvert the symbolic function of portraits as a reflection of identity. Reflecting on portraits of political leaders, ubiquitous in Indonesia, the artist has said: “we are not familiar with their true substance, their true face.” Here, his aggressive brushstrokes underscore emotion and expressiveness. The work reflects the boundary between the known and unknown, capturing the entirety of the human character with all its nuances.

 

Sarkashi Said 
Fish, 2017 Batik
33 × 56 in; 83.8 × 142.3 cm

Sarkashi Said
Sarkasi Said is internationally renowned for his contemporary approach to batik art. He came to prominence in the 1970s for his portrayal of the orchid on a dress and has become known for his unconventional use of a wax-resisting technique for batik painting and striking renditions of flora and fauna. Admirers of his work include the art historian, T. K. Sabapathy, who has praised the artist for his bold and effective use of colours, as well as the dynamic and intricate decorative elements in his paintings. In 2003, he set a Guinness World Record for making the world’s longest batik painting. 

 

Lindy Lee
Truth in distant places, 2017
Paper, fire and Chinese ink
29 9/10 × 22 2/5 in; 76 × 57 cm

Lindy Lee
This is one of Lindy Lee’s signature pyrographic works, produced by burning holes through sheets of heavyweight paper. The artist’s practice is deeply influenced by philosophies of Taoism and Zen Buddhism, and she adopts this method to explore questions of identity and spirituality. She employs chance and spontaneity to produce a galaxy of images that embody the intimate connections between human existence and the cosmos. The resulting works are meditative and often reveal their meanings gradually through time.

 

Jimmy Ong
Hock Lee Bus, 2015
Silkscreen print
17 7/10 × 11 4/5 in; 45 × 30 cm

Jimmy Ong
This work reflects the striking new dimension in Jimmy Ong’s recent works. Renowned for his figurative charcoal works on paper, Ong has begun delving into historical events and raising critical questions about how history is retold. This print depicts a group of policemen heaving away an incapacitated tiger by its paws. The scene is based on a photograph published in The Straits Times on 13 May 1955 of the violent Hock Lee Bus union riots, but Ong has replaced an injured rioter with a tiger. The grouping of figures is central to a drawing by Ong, Rampogan Macan (Spearing the Tiger), which depicts the aftermath of a large-scale gladiator-style entertainment provided by Javanese Sultans from the days of Dutch colonisation. The battles usually pitched a tiger (symbolising the colonials) against a bull (symbolising the local people), with the bull winning such battles.

 

Romulo Olazo
Untitled #385, 2012
Mixed media on canvas
24 × 24 in; 61 × 61 cm

Romulo Olazo
Untitled No. 385 is part of Romulo Olazo’s Untitled series, created in the artist’s late career and widely recognised as the bravest point of his practice. In this series, Olazo broke from the elegant austerity of his early works, daringly combining delicate opaque and transparent forms. This new bravado and spontaneity in his approach overturned preconceptions about his person and exceeded expectations about the linear evolution of his works. The Untitled series cemented Olazo’s position as a master in the pantheon of Philippine abstract painting.

 

Yayoi Kusama 
Mt Fuji of my heart speaks, 2015
Polychrome woodblock print
20 3/10 × 14 1/5 in; 51.6 × 36.1 cm Edition 4/120

Yayoi Kusama
This is part of an edition of 120 woodblock prints made by hand to reproduce the strokes and colours of a painting by Yayoi Kusama. Deeply moved by seeing the majestic Mount Fuji up close for the first time, Kusama painted this scene from her memory in a single sitting. Its bright vivid colours and poetic title are representative of the artist’s playful yet thought-provoking style.

Kusama is one of the most influential artists living today. Her shows have drawn record-breaking crowds at museums around the world, including the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid, Centre Georges Pompidou, in Paris, The Broad, Los Angeles, Tate Modern in London and National Gallery Singapore. 

 

 

Mangu Putra
Behind Time #2, 2018
Acrylic on jute
59 1/10 × 78 7/10 in; 150 × 200 cm

Mangu Putra
This work is from Mangu Putra’s most recent series of paintings, in which he reexamines the Dutch colonisation of Bali. Using archival photographs published by Dutch institutions in the colonial era as a starting point, Putra reimagines historic scenes, changing the emphasis by placing the Balinese people at the center. This follows the artist's decade-long research into the stories of Indonesian veterans and the surviving fighters of Indonesia's revolution: a generation of men who have been marginalised by history. Behind Time #2 also reflects Putra’s affinity for hyperrealism, and uncompromising attention to detail.


 

Ran Hwang
Ode to Second Full Moon, 2018
Paper, buttons, beads, crystals, pins on plexiglass
21 7/10 in diameter; 55 cm diameter

Ran Hwang
Ran Hwang is known for using modest materials from the fashion industry like buttons, beads and thread to create large-scale installations depicting traditional Eastern icons, such as the cherry blossom image in this work. Hwang constructs her works through a laborious and repetitive process reminiscent of a monk’s practice of meditation. The result is a textural surface that suggests subtle movements and a Zen methodology of creation.

A multiple award-winner, Hwang has exhibited globally in institutions in France, Korea, Switzerland and the United States. Her work is also a part of numerous public and private collections including The Brooklyn Museum, New York; The Des Moines Center for the Arts, Iowa; and The National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul.

 

Jane Lee
Blush, 2018
Acrylic, heavy gel on fibreglass
24 × 24 × 2 2/5 in; 61 × 61 × 6 cm

Jane Lee
This work demonstrates Jane Lee’s inventive techniques and use of materials. Composed of dense layers of acrylic paint and gel, it appears to melt or implode, straddling the line between 2D painting and 3D sculpture. The artist is known for examining and reworking the structural elements of painting. By treating the components of a painting—stretcher, canvas, and the paint itself—in new ways, she explores the very nature of how paintings are constructed.

Lee first came to critical attention in 2008, when her monumental installation Raw Canvas was featured in the Singapore Biennale curated by Fumio Nanjo, and has since gone on to showcase her works in Asia and Europe. She has won numerous awards, including a Celeste Prize for painting in 2011.

 

Ashley Bickerton 
DB - DS 2018, 2018
Oil and acrylic on jute with plywood, mother-of-pearl, coins, bamboo and resin
55 1/2 × 55 1/2 × 4 7/10 in; 141 × 141 × 12 cm

Ashley Bickerton
This mixed media piece is representative of Ashley Bickerton’s baroque approach to exploring contemporary society. Juxtaposing photographic and painterly elements with found objects, Bickerton often depicts alien figures amidst the detritus of consumer culture and offers a critique of capitalism.

Bickerton was an original member of a group of artists known as Neo-Geo, which emerged in New York during the 1980s and included Jeff Koons and Peter Halley. In 1993, he left New York for Bali, where his work became increasingly figurative. However, Bickerton’s investigation of materiality has remained a consistent thread throughout his practice. His works have been exhibited widely at institutions such as the Whitney Museum of Art, New York; Tate St. Ives, Cornwall and Victoria & Albert Museum, London. 

 

For more information on this year's Gallery Gala, click here


Any views or opinions in the post are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the company or contributors.



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