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Gianmaria Della Ratta

Tagliatelle.obj

by

Gianmaria Della Ratta

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Tagliatelle.obj by Gianmaria Della Ratta
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Tagliatelle.obj

by

Gianmaria Della Ratta

US$ 635

Overview

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2019

Material: Other

Limited Edition

Dimensions: 9cm (H) x 32cm (W) x 34cm (D) / 3.5" (H) x 12.6" (W) x 13.4" (D)

Note: Actual colours may vary due to photography & computer settings.

Artist Statement

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Tagliatelle comes from "tagliare" in Italian, "to cut". Born in Emilia Romagna, they were invented by the Bolognese chef, Zefirano. The correct width of Tagliatelle is 6mm, and it is really curious to know that in Bologna Chamber of Commerce, a golden replica of a piece of tagliatelle is demonstrating the correct dimensions being preserved in a glass case. Nowadays, the precision of industrial machines makes it very easy to obtain the right dimension but also to create it in a large amount and in different variations.

Tagliatelle.obj is one of the pieces of the limited edition collection "Pasta Shootah" in 100 pieces. A decorative element that is the result of two infinite tagliatelle that roll up, uniting and separating, without interruption, giving life to a sort of bowl with very recognizable features, which is supported by the media of 3D printing. It is entirely made in 3D printing with PLA filament and gold painted.
The object is the result of an innovative digital methodology that results in a whole new way of understanding 3D modelling and digital production.
In particular, for the digital creation of this element 450 frames of simulation were required to be digitally cut and printed with a 0.6mm nozzle.

In the global imagination, Italy means pasta and vice versa. The cliché, captured in “Mangiapasta” and other epithets (not always complimentary), transforms the country’s eating habits into the main characteristic of the people, fueling the stereotype of Italian identity. Not all Italians accepted this fate: in 1930, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti declared in the Manifesto of Futurist Cooking that it was time to abolish pasta as a symbol of the nation; an absurd gastronomic religion that made people lazy and heavy and unprepared for an increasingly mobile and fast-paced life. Nevertheless, nothing has changed.
Food culture has stagnated in Italy, a country that freezes tradition through conservation and idealises the normal. If pasta is a symbol of being Italian, how can design be used to question its deep-rooted conventions? How do new methodologies, 3D software, and new materials connect to a national heritage in which food, industry, and politics have always had a complex relationship? And what future possibilities do they reveal?

This project appropriates pasta as a primary source, beyond its culinary origins, to explore technology and making in a cultural context. By translating extrusion from the main method of pasta production to 3D software, new rules emerge for efficiency, form, scale, and process. This experimentation is an opportunity to create a new in a medium that is over 1,000 years old.

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Artist Profile

Born: 13

Hometown: Sant'Agata Dei Goti

Based in: Eindhoven

Gianmaria Della Ratta, born in 1993 in Sant’Agata dei Goti (BN), is an Italian designer.

His studio was founded in 2019 after obtaining his MA in Contextual Design at the Design Academy of Eindhoven (Holland), with the project “Pasta Shootah”. Currently, he is still in the Netherlands, where he, daily, dedicates himself to the realization of personal projects and collaboration with various companies, where he is often called to develop innovative projects in close consultation with the various research and development departments.

Abundance of expression and conceptual complexity coexist at the same time in his objects, amalgamated by the constant search for new production processes that often result in modern and innovative technologies used to overcome the current limitations of creation. Often starting from the origins of an object, he deconstructs it, to deepen its meaning, challenging the perception of material and immaterial and questioning the very sense of functionality. Through careful, cunning and uncommon digital manipulation, he manages to achieve completely unexpected and absolutely new results that not only distinguish his style but also give objects an attractive and never seen before aesthetic.

The unusual use of latest generation software is often part of his creative process that he pushes to the limit through choices mainly related to his intuition, which lead him to solutions not necessarily related to functional, aesthetic or market needs, but that results in a constant experimental and surprising approach.

To date, his work has been shown at Dutch Design Week 2018 and 2019, and in other smaller exhibitions where it has received approval from the general public as well as the press.
He was also a finalist and won several design and architecture awards both in Italy and abroad.

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More Works by Gianmaria Della Ratta

Spaghetti.obj

Gianmaria Della Ratta, Netherlands

Design Objects

US$ 475

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